Kids In Rural Southern Sweden

After we left our houseboat in Copenhagen, we headed south for an afternoon at the beach.

We ended up somewhere near Ishøj and parked near the art museum. We found toilets/ changing rooms, sandy beaches, lifeguards and a pier to trip-trap along and climb down into.

Ishøj beach

There was a bit of seaweed around, but plenty of sand and the kids decided it was too cold to swim ( others did though) but they paddled and made sand castles for an hour or two.

Finally, hunger drove us off the beach. We expected to find somewhere nearby selling food but there was nothing, so we got on the motorway east and before we knew it, we were driving across the Øresund Bridge (The Bridge!) into Sweden. Another new country for us!

 Driving across Øresund Bridge

By now the kids were ravenous and we pulled in at the next Burger King.  Luckily our car fitted under the drive thru height restriction AND they understood our order and we just sat in the car and wolfed down our lunch.

Our accommodation for the next four nights was a rural farmhouse near Visseltofta, in southern Sweden. We found the house on Airbnb and rented it as it was available on the dates we needed and was en route to Stockholm. We had quite an adventure trying to find it and once we did, we realised how very rural it was; despite being only 11 minutes drive to the nearest supermarket, it took us an hour to find the place!

But this wasn’t a problem, we had our car with us, and we used Google maps and Trip Advisor to investigate any places of interest nearby. Sweden was a bit end-of-seasonish, especially in the rural areas, but we managed to find stuff to do for the 4 nights we were there.

So in case you find yourself looking for things to do in Northern Skane county in Sweden, these are our recommendations.

DDs 1 and 3 wanted to go horse riding, so we rang the closest stables we could find, Stall Stingson. They spoke English and offered the girls a supervised hack through mossy woodland while the rest of us drove to Osby in search of a supermarket. Both the girls had a super exciting time as they’ve only every ridden in arenas before and they got to tack their ponies up and groom them afterwards. The owners were happy to talk to us about their stables and had a yard full of friendly cats and dogs. They also recommended we check out the next place, when we asked if they knew of anywhere to eat.

Ponies at Stall Stingson
We ended up at Denningarums gård ( farm) for lunch. They did a fantastic, and reasonably priced, smorgasbord and even super-fussy DS found something to eat. But the best bit about this place is that just across the very quiet lane, they have a kids play area with adventure playgrounds, a sandpit, trampolines and animals to feed. So we sat and ate lingonberry waffles in peace, while the kids squabbled cheerfully far enough away not to bother us.

Denningarums gard

Discovering new places like this are the reason we take road trips, and we came back here for lunch every day for three days as it was so relaxing.

According to TripAdvisor just 15 minutes away from our accommodation was an Elk Safari, so we had to see that. You can drive through the enclosure yourself, but we took the ‘train’ ( wagons pulled by a tractor) . Our children seemed to be the only ones who weren’t blond!

Elk Safari Train
We were handed branches of a tree to feed the Elk (or Moose) when we came across them, so the whole thing looked like some sort of jungle camouflage vehicle.

Elk food
Elk are big and keen on their food and basically come sprinting out of the woods to yank the offered branches out of your hands. I was surprised about how enthusiastic they were about it but most people had a stroke of them while they were eating and no one got hurt.

feeding elk in sweden
We also saw some bison, who were much less enthusiastic about being hand fed than the elk, and there was also a separate, smaller goat pen where two-legged kids can mix with the four-legged variety.

Mostly, the weather was kind to us but we had one rainy day while staying near Visseltofta. On that day we visited the nearby Brio museum. This place was a bit like the Tardis; bigger on the inside!

DH and I enjoyed looking at the display of toys from over the years and the kids appreciated the toys put out for playing. DS especially loved the enormous train track. It was glued down and he had stiff competition from several other boys of around the same age.

Brio Museum train track
The museum also had a Christmas-themed ‘elves’ workshop’ basement with a huge Brio Builder table and a couple of railway carriages next door containing a model railway, a few old sega games, some board games and a display of Barbies and Kens. There was enough there to keep us out of the rain for a couple of hours at least.

Toy horses brio museum
We found 4 nights/ 3 days was the perfect amount of time to spend in the area at this time of the year. We visited in the last couple of weeks of August which is no longer high season, so things were starting to wind down and some attractions were no longer open.

Despite our stay in Visseltofta acting as a stopover on our way to Stockholm, we enjoyed our time here and would recommend it as an area full of things for families to do, if you just happen to be driving around southern Sweden.

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